D. J. McAdam

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Life Lessons from Poker

By D. J. McAdam

poker players

One often hears it said that a person can learn a lot about life from playing poker.  This does not mean that all poker players end up as paragons of virtue, but the game of poker does seem to provide a great deal of food for thought for those of a contemplative nature.  I've listed below some of the important lessons I've learned from playing poker:


You can go into a situation holding the best hand, and still lose. 

You can go into a situation not holding the best hand, and still win. 

In the short run, luck is more important than skill.

In the long run, skill is more important than luck.

Cheaters always get caught. 

There are only two ways to get better at something; practice and study.

Patience really is a virtue.

Jumping at every possible opportunity that comes your way is a good way to squander your resources. 

The less honest you are with yourself, the more you're going to lose; and vice versa.

When something bad happens, the best way to handle it is to stay calm and composed.

When something good happens, the best way to handle it is to stay calm and composed.

People aren't always honest. 

People aren't always dishonest.

The more you talk, the more you give away about yourself. 

Always give serious thought to the impression your appearance makes upon others. 

Never make an important decision when you're tired or have recently consumed alcohol.

Never give up; you never know for certain whether you're going to end up ahead or behind until the last hand is dealt.

If you're going to play the game, you may as well get as much enjoyment as you can out of it.

 


 

 

 

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